What the Storyteller Knows (Grey Heron Nights 12)

Yes, there’s some overlap in these recent posts; after all, I’m making it up as I go along. Each early morning with a notebook brings a new set of reflections to add to the soup. Dream-makers, memory-keepers, storytellers – in a sense, they’re all part of the same thing. But they each have different gifts, and each of those gifts is critical at this time in its own unique way.

Read More

Advertisements

What the Riddler Knows (Grey Heron Nights 7)

Winter Solstice. Today, at 16.28 GMT. The still point of the turning world. Where the dance is. Will you dance, at 16.28 GMT? I will. I’ve been practicing my still dance, my contradictory dance, my paradoxical dance: my dance that is a dance and yet is a still point at the same time. That’s what I’ve been working on for the past few days. To repeat my Eliot quote from the beginning of all this:

Read More

What Water Knows (Grey Heron Nights 4)

What water knows is how to adapt. How to become liquid, snow, ice or vapour, depending on what is required of you – and yet always to remain, at heart, the pure essence of what you are. (It’s always H2O.)

Water is the essence of change: it can mirror, conceal or reveal, depending on whether or how it moves.

Water is the essence of contradiction: it can soothe, and heal – but it can also kill.

Water, in many mythologies, is the primeval substance of creation, and studies of evolution suggest that life on Earth evolved out of water.

Read More

MythLines 3: This world, the Otherworld, and the anima mundi

Continuing on with republishing my series of ‘MythLines’ columns from EarthLines Magazine … here is my offering (slightly expanded for this blog) from Issue 16, in November 2016.

(Featured image by Martin Stranka)


 

I’ve spent a lot of years studying the psychology of myth. My personal perspectives can be reduced to this, in a slightly oversimplified nutshell: Sigmund Freud’s theories on anything – inevitably, interminably, explaining everything in sexual terms – rarely interest me much at all; Carl Jung is marvelous (an inexhaustible, treasure-filled, deep well) but often a little too human-centred for my tastes; archetypal psychologist James Hillman takes psychology and mythology out of our heads and back into the world again, and so is always to be revered. Read More

MythLines 1: The Cailleach and the Wise Woman

For the past couple of years I’ve written a column, ‘MythLines’, for EarthLines Magazine. Since EarthLines has now closed its doors and soon will no longer be for sale, over the next few weeks I plan to post those articles here. The first is an article from Issue 13 in November 2015.

Read More

The psychology of mythology: or, why the Otherworld is just as real as this one

I’ve spent a lot of years studying the psychology of myth. For me, in a slightly oversimplified nutshell, it all come down to this: Freud’s theories on anything – inevitably, interminably, explaining everything in sexual terms – rarely interest me much at all; Jung is marvelous but often a little too human-centred for my tastes; James Hillman takes psychology and mythology back out of our heads and into the world again, and so is always to be revered.

Read More